Tuesday, May 23, 2017

HAVE Your Cake and EAT it, Too

Living in our world, in a nutshell, can be summed up by the title of this post, which is also a well-known cliché. But it’s a cliché for a reason.
We swallow these contradictions all the time. Literally.

 

We don’t want to meddle in the affairs of other, be they neighbors or nations. But if we don’t, aren’t we complicit in the wrong doings we witness?

 

We mustn’t compare our efforts or results to anyone else’s. But then, what does any sort of rating ever mean, be it on Yelp, Amazon, or an informal comment?

 

We want to keep a smiley face on not only for others, but to buoy our spirits. But we commit to truthful and honest interactions and encourage others to do the same.

 

When public good and private good collide, we rationalize. When we can’t rationalize, we declare reason overrated. Then we question others’ rating. Who says it’s so?

 

I woke up this morning with a strange realization: life is about managing contradictions.

 
 

Now I’m excited about fashioning a story that explores just that. No doubt, it will have a neat ending, suggesting a resolution after all was said and done.

 

But this, too, will be an oxymoron.

And so it goes. Told you.
 
 
 

10 comments:

  1. I thought it was about having your cake and another on the side. Oooh a book about oxymorons would be great fun! Write it!!!

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    1. I'm thinking of giving my characters existential contradictions to deal with, rather than a nonfiction essay on oxymorons.
      As I mull it over, I realize most of my stories include something of this theme. But now I'm wondering whether I could work it to the front row. ;)

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  2. I love oxymorons, especially the ones to whom I gave birth: my adult children.

    Love,
    Janie

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  3. Love that cartoon! And your story idea sounds great, Mirka. (Janie, I like your 'adult children' also. So true.)

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  4. Go for it, sounds like a fun and clever theme.

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  5. Any word that contains "moron" must be ripe for a story!

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    1. :D
      You reminded me of a friend who was placed in a group the educators called "heterogeneous," and always thought she was in the GENEOUS class.

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