Monday, September 14, 2015

(Another) HAPPY (Jewish) NEW-YEAR

According to the Jewish calendar, we just entered year 5776.

That, according to tradition, is counting back to the creation of the world.
Certainly, not the world as the geologists count it, or the world as the Christians count it from the birth of Christ, or the world as the Muslims count it from Muhammad’s emigration from Mecca to Medina, or the Hindu count from the start of the Kali Yuga, which, incidentally, is startlingly close to the Jewish start.

It’s the world as we count it, and it’s old enough for me.


It’s also the time when all who are not diabetic are invited to slop-up inordinate amounts of honey, drizzled over everything.

Whether this is your count or not, come and have some anyway.
Honey cake recipe: (Easy and full proof)
Turn oven to 350 Fahrenheit (or 175 Celsius). Spray non-stick for baking on two 9”by 5” by 3”, that's inches, (standard) loaf pans.

Mix—
2 cups honey
1 cup strong coffee (decaf is fine. It’s for flavor), brewed and cooled
2 TBS. Brandy
4 eggs, beaten
½ cup oil

Add—
½ cup brown sugar

Sift together—
3 and ½ cups flour
1 TBS. baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
TBS. spices (Cinnamon, ginger, cloves, allspice)

Add the dry sifted mixture to the liquid and mix well. Bake loaves for 50 minutes to an hour.

*Here comes the crucial part— wrap cooled loaves in foil and do not eat until at least three days have passed. This is a difference between an ok spice cake to a great Jewish Honey Cake. And you've got a spare loaf to give as a gift!* 


11 comments:

  1. A happy Rosh Hashanah to you Mirka.

    Looks like a most delectable honey cake!

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  2. Shana Tova, Mirka! Thanks for the recipe. It looks good.

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  3. I hope it's a great year for you, Mirka.

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  4. A blessed Rosh Hashanah to you, dearest Mirka!

    Can I also say--Shana Tova--or is that greeting only for fellow Jews?

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    1. "Shana Tova" is "good year" in Hebrew. Nothing exclusive about that. Everyone is welcome to speak Hebrew ;)

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  5. What an interesting recipe--2 cups of honey! In Korea, honey is VERY expensive. But I bet this cake smells delicious! I DO like that Jewish New Year date from the creation of the world! I was just explaining to my daughter it was the Jewish New Year because her English teacher is having them read NIGHT by Elie Wiesel, and it mentioned that holiday.

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  6. My mouth is watering. Happy New Year, Mirka!

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  7. Very cool to know. I love honey. Sounds like I'd be right at home.

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  8. Wow that's a lot of honey, sounds delicious. I'm also surprised that one is supposed to wait three days before eating the cake. That must be hard to do after filling the kitchen with spicy aromas.

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    1. It's very low fat as such go, and it is the "ripening" of the honey that gives this a characteristic and unmistakable texture, not like a typical cake or quick bread. The wait is the real challenge, you got that right. Everything else about this recipe is foolproof and easy.

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  9. Honey cakes sound heavenly. I have a severe sweet tooth, especially after dinner. Happy Jewish New Year, Mirka!

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