Tuesday, January 30, 2018

January 30, This Day in HISTORY

There is something ominously grim when I look at January 30th’s notable marks. On this calendar day in 1933, Hitler was sworn as chancellor of Germany. On this calendar day in 1948, Gandhi was assassinated. On this calendar date in 1956, African-American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.'s home is bombed in retaliation for the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

That’s just for starters. On this date, also---

·         1925 – The Government of Turkey expels Patriarch Constantine VI from Istanbul.
·         1930 – The Politburo of the Soviet Union orders the extermination of the Kulaks.
·         1969The Beatles' last public performance, on the roof of Apple Records in London. The police break up the impromptu concert.
·         1972The Troubles: Bloody Sunday: British paratroopers open fire on anti-internment marchers in Derry, Northern Ireland, killing 13 people; another person later dies of injuries sustained.
·         1979 – A Varig Boeing 707-323C freighter disappears over the Pacific Ocean 30 minutes after taking off from Tokyo.

And so much more.



If this is your birthday, I apologize. I hope you celebrate with gusto and do something wonderful so the cloud hovering over this date lightens a little. Many small and a few great actions can make the kettle less black. Let’s polish it into a beautiful reflective silver shine.

I don’t know what is set in stone, predestined, or guided by unseen patterns. What I am sure of is that what we do matters.

History was. Now let’s make some.

15 comments:

  1. Well, we're having yet another blizzard, so maybe it's the wild weather on January 30th that's to blame?

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    1. Not unless you live where there are no blizzards, ever.. ;)

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  2. It's strange how dates can hold such bad incidents. There's one date in particular next month that holds several bad incidents for my family. I never could figure out why awful things happen on that day.

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    1. I think of this as a reminder that there are layers of mysteries Science and human reason have no domain in.

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  3. Oh how terrible. But you are right--what we do matters. It's also the feast day of St. Bathilda (sp) who was sold into slavery but who became a queen and the first to banish slavery in France. I love saint stories--they show such heroic virtue.

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    1. Blessed Saint Bathilda. This maybe a mitigating dot on the January 30 timeline.

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  4. This was a sobering post! Sad to think so many awful things happened on the same date. Maybe people being born on January 30th can reduce the ominous quality.

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    1. Yes, calling all January 30th birthdays to go out and make the world better!

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  5. Very strange! I have a very happy anniversary on January 31, so maybe that mitigates a bit. (It was the day M mumbled--uh, proposed--to me.)

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    1. Ah, it all changes the next day... :D

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    2. P.S.
      I should have put a winking face on my comment above, Barbara. I really don't pretend to make sense of these things.

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  6. "Many small and a few great actions can make the kettle less black." Oh how true. I plan to use that gem of wisdom the next time one of my grandkids uses the excuse that something is too hard or not worth the effort. Those dates were chilling. A good reminder to avoid repeating our mistakes. To always, move forward.

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    1. And I'm going to imagine your grandkid's face when you say that :D
      Whereever there are grandkids, there's hope.

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  7. The dates and historical facts you note are chilling. My guess is that one could find equally awful events on other days of the year, but also awesomely good happenings. Somehow, the latter don't get into the headlines, but I wish they did.

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  8. I never realized January 30th was such an ominous day. :( Hopefully only good events will happen on that date from this point on.

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