Tuesday, June 13, 2017

This Day in History

Many things happened on this day in recorded history, some good and many bad. But I choose to focus on something great that happened this date a century and a half ago. I’m only sorry I’m a year late to commemorate the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary.
 
 
1866 US House of Representatives passes 14th Amendment. (Civil rights)
 
 
It is this amendment that finally fulfilled America’s declarations of independence, which stated all men were created equal and endowed by the creator to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. (It would take a few more years before this would come to stand for all men and women.) It is the fourteenth amendment that made former slaves into full citizens.
 
 
Here is what section one of this amendment is says:
 
All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.
 
 
Aspects of this important constitutional clarification are debated even to this day. But most Americans hold it as part of the fabric that is our nation, one that is based on an idea, not on a nationality or racial ancestry or a specific religion.
There’s what to celebrate.
 
{From the front page of the Cleveland Leader June 14 1866}


5 comments:

  1. Definitely an anniversary worth celebrating.

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  2. Amen!!! One would think personhood is obvious, but even today, our littlest persons are not granted this right to life. So we have a ways to go.

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  3. Definitely worth celebrating. Great clip art to accompany!

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  4. June 13 would have been my grandfather's 96 birthday. :( I miss him.

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    Replies
    1. Private history counts as well. Maybe more.

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